BONNIE MOD #10
British Customs Air Injection Removal Kit

Preface: Chronologically, this post is out of sync. It was more involved, requiring more write up and photos. Being my lazy self, it took a while to post.

After installing the TEC 2-1 Exhaust (see BONNIE MOD #6), the bike gained a lot more performance. Much lighter, quicker start off, and much cooler sounding for sure. Rock and roll! However, I suddenly had a lot of backfiring. It’s quite simple, really. Adhering to USA fuel efficiency regulations (dictated by California), the stock pea shooters have catalytic convertors. Not the TECs (hence their performance advantage – a slight increase in horsepower).

NOTE: I live in New York. Motorcycles have to pass a yearly safety inspection in order to get a registration sticker. However, unlike automobile cages, they are not subjected to any emissions testing. So I can make mods willy-nilly to the exhaust system and still pass muster. Your state may vary however, so please check beforehand. The strictest state is California, so Triumph builds their USA destined bikes to pass their tests, so I’ve been told.

The purpose of air injection is to create an atmosphere within the pipe that will burn off any unspent fuel rather than spitting it out with the exhaust. Without a catalytic convertor, there is a lot more unspent fuel that ends up sparking (noticeable as a ‘pop’, mostly when gearing down).

So… I had two choices (with my set up). Live with the backfiring (some riders think it’s cool sounding, and that’s totally okay, and greener) or don’t allow the backfiring in the first place. I opted to disallow backfiring. To do this, you have to NOT inject air into the exhaust mix, hence the Air Injection Removal Kit. Basically, you’re removing the air injection bits and plugging up the holes left behind. Not a lot of hard labor by any means (unlike the air box removal – that’s a post further down the road).

Not much is required – you take off a lot and add back very little. If you’re a seasoned mechanic, you probably have the necessary bits laying around. You could also try scrounging around Home Depot for the bits. It’s not a lot, really. I opted to go with the British Customs kit – two sump bolts and a pair of rubber hole patchers. Overpriced at $25, material-wise, (+ $8 shipping) but worth the performance boost. The kit has carb jet plugs (which I didn’t need) so it works for both EFI and carbureted models.

British Customs Air Injection Removal Kit for Triumph Bonneville T100 courtesy of USPS. Bonnie Cafe.
British Customs Air Injection Removal Kit for Triumph Bonneville T100 courtesy of USPS. Bonnie Cafe.

Okay, so let’s begin…

The seat and gas tank both need to be removed. Luckily, I’m now using the British Customs Quick Release Seat Bolts (install mod here) so the seat was easy peasy. For the gas tank, I followed a Delboy tip. Rather than unplugging petrol connections (and subsequently demeaning their seals), I ran the bike down to an empty tank and then unbolted it from the frame (the two bolts at the front of the seat), and merely shifted it sideways on the frame, making sure to use a towel to prevent any scratches and to help bed it.

These are the only two bolts that attach the gas tank to the frame of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.
These are the only two bolts that attach the gas tank to the frame of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.
Shifting the gas tank in order to access the air injection piping leading into the engine of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.
Shifting the gas tank in order to access the air injection piping leading into the engine of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.

I know that this is not a best practice but I’ve found that every original Triumph seal that I crack tends to leak no matter how much I tighten it. In this case, I didn’t want gas (can I say petrol now that I ride a British bike?) leaking onto the hot engine. I’m sure that I’m being silly. Do as you wish.

On the right hand side - the air injection piping leading into the engine of a Triumph Bonneville T100. The red is the spark plug, BTW. Bonnie Cafe.
The air injection piping leading into the engine of a Triumph Bonneville T100. The red is the spark plug, BTW. Bonnie Cafe.

Now that you have easy access, you want to remove the air injection piping from the engine. Start by cracking off the crimping bracket from the top of the ai tube. I found this to be a bit tricky. What worked best was using a flat head screwdriver, inserting it into the crimp, and twisting until the crimp popped open.

On the right hand side - cracking off the top crimp of the air injection pipe leading into the engine of a Triumph Bonneville T100.  Bonnie Cafe.
Cracking off the top crimp of the air injection pipe leading into the engine of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.

Once that’s done, you’re free to remove the tubing from the top of the pipe and proceed to unscrew the pipe up and out of the engine. A box end wrench twisted in several (many) small movements works best.

On the right hand side - pulling the tubing off of the air injection pipe leading into the engine of a Triumph Bonneville T100.  Bonnie Cafe.
Pulling the tubing off of the air injection pipe leading into the engine of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.
Using a box end wrench to remove the air injection pipe from the engine of a Triumph Bonneville T100.  Bonnie Cafe.
Using a box end wrench to remove the air injection pipe from the engine of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.
The sump bolt that will plug up hole left behind by removing the air injection pipe from the engine of a Triumph Bonneville T100.  Bonnie Cafe.
The sump bolt that will plug up hole left behind by removing the air injection pipe from the engine of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.

Making sure not to over-torque it, the sump bolt now is screwed into place using an allen key. Oh… make sure that you use the copper crush washers. These will bind down and provide a good mechanical seal. So far, I’ve used these on the master cylinder and the exhaust – they are quite handy. I did NOT use any Loctite or other substance. I did not want to risk introducing any substance into the engine. (Let me know if I’m being overly cautious.)

Right side - British Customs sump bolt in place of the now removed air injection pipe of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.
Right side – British Customs sump bolt in place of the now removed air injection pipe of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.

Now move over to the left hand side of the bike, rinse, and repeat.

Right side - cracking off the tubing from the air injection pipe of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.
Left side – cracking off the clamp to remove the tubing from the air injection pipe of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.
Right side - cracking off the tubing from the air injection pipe of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.
Left side – cracking off the clamp to remove the tubing from the air injection pipe of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.
Left side - removing the air injection pipe from the engine of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.
Left side – removing the air injection pipe from the engine of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.
Left side - replacing the air injection tube with a sump bolt. Bonnie Cafe.
Left side – replacing the air injection tube with a sump bolt and crush washer. Bonnie Cafe.

Okay. Air is no longer being injected into the engine. We’re done, right? I wish. Nope, there is all the supplementary gear that aided in the air injection process. It’s still hanging on the bike, like a withered grape on the vine – no longer of use (unless you’re making raisins). These bits need to be excised.

This part can be a bit daunting due to the fear of pulling off necessary bits, so let me post this next pic to help you out. It shows everything that gets removed during this entire mod. If you find yourself removing something, anything that is not shown in this photo, STOP! You might possibly be removing something vital.

The leftover bits after removing the stock air injection kit from a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.
The leftover bits after removing the stock air injection kit from a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe. (Leaves are for artistic purposes only – my Irving Penn tribute.)

Study the above photo well. Do not remove anything that doesn’t resemble anything in the above photo. You’ve been warned.

(One request from yours truly. I am, by no means, properly educated in the full inner workings of this system. Feel free to interject your knowledge of this system in the comments. I would greatly appreciate it. At this point, I am simply flying by on what works by trial and error and The Google. I would also greatly appreciate being corrected if I am using wrong terminology. Thanks.)

Okay. So what needs to be done is to remove the air feed tubing that goes from the air box to the solenoid (which will stay on frame) and the actual silver metal pump box (which gets removed) that pushes the air into the engine. As said, the valve will be left behind on the frame. Follow along…

Pump of an air injection system of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.
The pump of an air injection system of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.
solenoid of an air injection system of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.
The solenoid of an air injection system of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.

Lots of spaghetti. First pull out the tubing from the air box and plug up the hole with the British Customs supplied stopper.

Pulling out the air uptake tube in the air box of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.
Pulling out the air uptake tube in the air box of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.
Plugging the hole of the air uptake tube in the air box of a Triumph Bonneville T100 with a British Customs plug. Bonnie Cafe.
Plugging the hole of the air uptake tube in the air box of a Triumph Bonneville T100 with a British Customs plug. Bonnie Cafe.
Plugging the hole of the air uptake tube in the air box of a Triumph Bonneville T100 with a British Customs plug. Bonnie Cafe.
Plugging the hole of the air uptake tube in the air box of a Triumph Bonneville T100 with a British Customs plug. Bonnie Cafe.

I’ve got to say, though… I’m disappointed in the plug that British Customs supplied. It did not fit well and wasn’t designed properly. In fact, it seemed like an off-the-shelf, kinda fits component rather than one specifically made for its purpose. Yeah, I’m being nit-picky but I spent over $30 bucks for this kit. Anyway, I had to crink it which left a gap. The sleeve should have been designed with grooves to allow it to mold better. Okay, it’s a plastic plug so let’s move on.

Now remove the uptake tube from the solenoid…

Air uptake tube leading into the solenoid of the air injection system of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.
Air uptake tube leading into the solenoid of the air injection system of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.
Air uptake tube removed from the solenoid of the air injection system of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.
Air uptake tube removed from the solenoid of the air injection system of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.

Now switch sides over to the right hand side of the bike in order to tackle the removal of the pump.

Pump of the air injection system of a Triumph Bonneville T100.  On the left is the tube leading from the solenoid and underneath is the tube leading to the now removed air injection pipe. Bonnie Cafe.
Pump of the air injection system of a Triumph Bonneville T100. On the left is the tube leading from the solenoid and underneath is the tube leading to the now removed air injection pipe. Bonnie Cafe.

Since the solenoid will be staying on the bike (Why? More on this in a moment.), you’ll need to release the tubing from it that leads to the pump. However, no need to remove the tubes from the pump since that whole assembly will be chucked off the bike. In the above photo you’ll see that I’m removing the two bolts holding the pump to the frame. Once those are out, pull the tube off the solenoid and pull off the pump.

Releasing the air injection pump from the frame of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.
Releasing the air injection pump from the frame of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.
The air injection pump removed from the frame of a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.
The air injection pump removed from the frame of a Triumph Bonneville T100. You’ll notice that the solenoid has shifted off its mounting. Stay tuned. Bonnie Cafe.

The air injection system has now effectively been removed. Holster the solenoid back into position. Perhaps you want to secure it but I haven’t found that necessary.

The solenoid left behind after the air injection pump has been disconnected from it. Bonnie Cafe.
The solenoid left behind after the air injection pump has been disconnected from it. Bonnie Cafe.

So why is the solenoid remaining behind? It is basically functionless at this point but is tied into the electrical system. Pulling it off will require soldering in a resistor. I plan on doing that but for the moment, this is the easier solution. If you were to start the bike now, you’ll feel timed puffs of air coming out it but that’s it. No harm, no foul. I imagine you’ll get a miniscule performance boost by removing it but I can’t imagine it much. As said, I plan on removing it. I’ll post a follow up when I do.

So… put back your gas tank and seat and there you have it, Triumph Bonneville Air Injection Removal 101. The bike is running much smoother. Remember, I did this in response to swapping out the stock exhaust with a non-catalytic system. I cannot speak to how this mod would perform with the stock Triumph exhaust system. If you’re putting in an after-market exhaust system, this is a must-mod.

Cheers.

Air injection system removed from a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.
Air injection system removed from a Triumph Bonneville T100. Bonnie Cafe.

Tools Required:
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Flat Head Screwdriver

Company URL:
British Customs

Price:
$40 + Shipping

5 Comments

  1. For your info : there is a free downloadable program called “TuneECU” which when loaded onto your PC (and using a connecting cable) allows you to communicate with the bikes ECU.

    This permits the minor re-configuring of the parameters to tell the bike that it no longer runs AI, as a result there is no need for a resistor to ‘fool’ the system and you can completely remove the last vestige of the AI system.

    But it does SO MUCH MORE !

    With this program you can load and install different fuelling maps (for differing inlet and exhaust set-ups); check for fault codes etc etc. Well worth having. I have used on my 2010 T100 to change the map to delete AI and O² sensors, as well as installing a TTP map designed for my current configuration of mods.

    Cheers
    Dave

  2. while your there dong this move the horn to the frt bolt right side [ needs a flat washer ] and hoen sits sideways under frame over the valve cover ..loosen horn nut rotate till contacts are frt up above the coil re route the horn wires over the coil and replug in tighten all ..ok you say i need the horn .. no you have the pipes and stock horn is crap … so why do this ..well your next mod will be the reg move / relocator to frame where the horn is [ looks better ] ok you say they have a place to hang the horn under the reg bracket .. ya but it blocks the air flow through the oil cooler and looks like crap … so move the horn now and be done with it ..

  3. I know i’m late to the party, but if you want a quick fix to disable the AI, then remove the seat detach the hose from the airbox, then you can either crimp the hose with a cable tie and tuck it away under the fuel tank and block the airbox hole up with a bung of some kind, or instead of crimping the hose, block it off with a marble or some other item and put the hose back onto the airbox. This will stop the popping noise when decelerating and if you do need the AI attached to pass emission test where you live, it’s a simple reversal of taken out the marble and putting the hose back into the airbox and hey presto the bike is back as it was for the test procedure.I had already removed my Ai system like you did as well before learning this trick.

  4. I chose this because the new exhaust i put on the bike had to much air being forced into it and would pop as loud as a gunshot while decelerating. I wanted to stop the deceleration popping and snatchy throttle issues associated with the air injection on the Bonneville.

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