2014 TRIUMPH BONNEVILLE T100 FOR SALE

The state of my Triumph Bonneville T100 motorcycle at the end of June 2015. Bonnie Café.
The state of my Triumph Bonneville T100 motorcycle at the end of June 2015. Bonnie Café.

It is with much difficulty and after deep internal debate that I bring you this news. No doubt I’ll be considered a traitor by some. I won’t dispute the charge.

A little over three weeks ago I purchased a used BMW R1200GS.

Riding off with the newly purchased BMW R1200GS. Bonniecafe.com
Your host riding off with the newly purchased BMW R1200GS. Bonniecafe.com

If you’re not familiar with the bike, it’s an enduro/dual-sport bike. Let me cut to the chase – I immediately fell in love with the bike and I continue to do so. Within the past three weeks, I’ve taken a four day/1100 mile camping journey through Canada, and a 3 day/710 mile camping journey through Vermont. I’m currently in the midst of planning a 12 day/2500 mile journey in September. This bike is a game changer. Once you jump on, it’s extremely difficult to jump off.

I love my Bonneville. I’m especially proud of all the work I put into it and the modding I’ve done. I know that I’ve built a beautiful bike. However, the R1200GS pushes me to explore and I’ve come to realize that this is the true spirit of a motorcycle – unabashed freedom. I’ve been riding for 30 some years and have loved every minute of it but nowhere near as much as I do now. I’ve spent time crafting the Bonneville into some other bike whereas the R1200GS needs no crafting whatsoever, I just ride. It’s been an eye opening experience.

As such, I’ve decided to sell the Bonneville. Yes, the hero and mainstay of this blog. Sure, I “want” two bikes but do I “need” two bikes? I live in Manhattan and this is the deciding factor. It is simply too expensive to maintain two bikes – insurance, parking, upkeep, etc. It’s also extravagant.

I haven’t decided on a price yet. I’m also trying to determine whether I should sell the bike as customized and sell all of the stock OEM parts separately, or put back to stock and sell all of the 3rd party parts separately, or sell everything as one big package.

Let me know what you think. You can contact me here or leave a comment below.

Cheers.

The BMW R1200GS along railroad tracks in St-Philippe, Québec, Canada. This bike can go almost anywhere. Bonniecafe.com
The BMW R1200GS taking a break after riding along railroad tracks in St-Philippe, Québec, Canada. This bike can go almost anywhere. It’s exhilarating! Bonniecafe.com

6 Comments

  1. Congrats on the new bike! I’ve always liked the gs. As far as the bonnie goes, i’d take off the custom parts and return it to stock. You’ll never get your money back if you sell it in its current state. Then try to sell the custom parts to recover at least some of what you paid. Or if you don’t really care, then just sell it as is as you might find someone who really likes it customized. Happy riding.

  2. Aw man, so sad to see the Bonnie go! However, I completely understand and congrats on the new GS. That is one helluva good bike indeed. Any plans to blog your adventures on the GS?

  3. Yea, i understand selling the bonnie all at once to get it over with. I’m actually going the opposite way of you. I traded in my triumph tiger 800 adventure bike for my bonnie because i wanted to go old school. I just wanted a normal motorcycle. Turns out i am customizing my bonnie more than i ever did with my harley. Go figure. Thanks for the link to your other site. I’ll probably start following that one too.

  4. Hello Judy

    I have visited your blog even before I purchased my 2011 bonneville just this past week. Your customizations have helped me plan out what I need to do to my bike. Thank you for the inspiration. I will miss your mod updates. If you decide to part out then I might be interested in a few things. Good luck with your new ride!

    Ahmad

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